1. Home
  2. News
  3. LEGALIZE PRAGIA AND OKADA IN THE COUNTRY TO REDUCE UNEMPLOYMENT – BIBIANI PRAGIA RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAIRMAN TO PARLIAMENT

LEGALIZE PRAGIA AND OKADA IN THE COUNTRY TO REDUCE UNEMPLOYMENT – BIBIANI PRAGIA RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAIRMAN TO PARLIAMENT

LEGALIZE PRAGIA AND OKADA IN THE COUNTRY TO REDUCE UNEMPLOYMENT – BIBIANI PRAGIA RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAIRMAN TO PARLIAMENT
0

Unemployment remains a persistent challenge in many countries around the world, and finding innovative solutions to combat it is crucial for fostering economic growth and social stability. In recent times, the Bibiani Pragia Riders Association Chairman, Mr. Anthony Anan, has called upon the parliament and government to consider legalizing Pragia and Okada as a means to alleviate unemployment in their country. This proposal has ignited a discourse on the potential benefits of embracing these modes of transportation and their impact on local economies.

Mr. Anan’s plea for the legalization of Pragia and Okada stems from his belief that these forms of transportation can play a pivotal role in reducing the unemployment rate. Pragia, also known as tricycles or trikes, and Okada, referring to motorcycle taxis, are often associated with informal and unregulated transportation services. However, their prevalence in certain regions indicates an existing demand for their services, which can be transformed into legitimate and regulated economic activities.

One of the chief arguments put forth by Mr. Anan is that Pragia and Okada riders contribute significantly to the economy, generating Internal Generated Funds (IGF) that can bolster local municipalities. These riders have already demonstrated their willingness to pay taxes and fees, suggesting a potential for formalizing their operations and contributing to revenue streams. Additionally, the presence of over 2000 tricycles in operation in Bibiani alone exemplifies the scope of this industry and its potential to create jobs.

The Pragia and Okada industry has emerged as a viable source of employment, providing opportunities for a diverse range of individuals, including graduates and students. Members of the association highlight that these modes of transportation have enabled graduates who were previously part of the unemployment graduate Association of Ghana to find employment. Furthermore, students have been able to fund their education through these ventures, presenting a tangible way for them to achieve their educational goals.

The positive impact of Pragia and Okada businesses is not limited to financial contributions alone. Mr. Anan’s statement that more than 20 of their members were able to have successful marriages this year, while others started building their own houses, reflects the potential for these endeavors to uplift communities. The economic empowerment provided by these transportation options extends beyond immediate financial gains, as it allows individuals to invest in their personal lives and futures.

Mr. Anan and his association’s call for the urgent consideration of the legalization of Pragia and Okada underscores the immediacy of the issue. The potential benefits to employment, local economies, and the livelihoods of individuals cannot be overlooked. As unemployment continues to challenge many nations, it is imperative for policymakers to engage in informed discussions regarding the merits and regulations surrounding these forms of transportation.

Conclusion

The case for legalizing Pragia and Okada in Ghana is not only rooted in the need to address unemployment but also in the opportunity to harness an existing informal sector to drive economic growth. Mr. Anthony Anan’s plea, supported by the Bibiani Pragia Riders Association, highlights the potential benefits these modes of transportation can offer. With careful consideration of regulations and standards, Ghana could unlock a new avenue for job creation, economic empowerment, and social development.

tags:

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *